Aside

John Williams, Grace Kelly and Rene Blancard in TCAT

Lucas North in black ops outfit makes one think what a sexy cat burglar Mr. A would make.

*Screencap RANet, other images Wikipedia)

Can’t you just see RA dressed from head to toe in black,that lithe body moving with the stealth and grace of a great dark feline, slipping in and out of the bedchambers of the wealthy to relieve them of their precious jewels? Wooing the gems (and other articles of attire) right off some unsuspecting and enamored female?

Yes, I’ve been watching Turner Classic Movies again. I cannot begin to tell you how much I love TCM with its uncut, commercial-free films from silents to great movies of more recent vintage. I am always discovering some new gem I have never seen and happily revisiting favorites. Thank you, Ted Turner.

Tonight I re-watched Alfred Hitchcock’s To Catch a ThiefSet on the French Riveria in the mid 1950s, it offers witty dialogue, a romance complete with fireworks and plenty of pretty for the eyes:  gorgeous location scenery, gorgeous attire worn by gorgeous Grace Kelly, not to mention Cary Grant looking suave–and quite gorgeous– in a tux.  There is also a lavish masquerade ball sequence  with attendees in 18th century attire including an anachronistic gold lame gown that must be seen to be believed.

Cary plays  John Roby, a former trapeze artist turned jewel thief (“To my credit, I only stole from those who could afford it”). Roby has been paroled from prison for his service to the French resistance in WW II and grows grapes and flowers to earn his crust these days. Kelly is Frances, a spoiled, bored rich girl ( Frances’ mother: “I wish I hadn’t sent her to that finishing school. I think they did finish her off”) traveling with her delightfully down-to-earth mum.

A series of jewel thefts is taking place on the Riveria and the authorities are sure Roby, “The Cat,” is back in business. Grant has to prove his innocence while trying to avoid the police . . .

It’s a very enjoyable movie and yet again, I found myself casting Richard in the lead role–elegant, intelligent, crafty, alluring with an interesting back story. And he gets the girl and lives past the final credits. I think you can see the appeal I find in that.

Wouldn’t he make a great cat burglar?

19 responses »

    • Hi, Heather!

      I adore Cary and Hitch. Funny you mention North by Northwest; I did a post on it a few days ago referencing it as one of Richard’s favorite movies as well as one of my own. We obviously all have good taste. 😀 I can watch Cary Grant and Hitchcock’s movies over and over again.

  1. Yes, oh yes! He could use all his elegance, muscle tension and strength in such a role and his dancer’s sense of how his body is positioned in space (there is a word for that, but I forgot it). How I loved Lucas in the black SAS outfit!

    • And you know Cary Grant was originally an acrobat. So he loved roles that also allowed him to use his physicality. Watching him dressed in black stealthily making his way across the rooftops could only make me think of Richard (and I loved Lucas’s black ops outfit, too, it was yummy!) and how well he could perform such a role. He reminds me so much of a big graceful and elegant feline, anyway. 😀

    • Also during this RA drought and my recovery time from the accident I find myself watching a lot of old movies and thinking about the sort of roles I would like to see Richard play. There are worse ways to spend one’s time, surely??

      • Sure there are! 🙂

        Am I paranoid or were there better roles for masculine men and feminine women in those old films? Make-up was also used to make the stars as glamorous as possible…*sigh*. Sadly remakes are rarely really successful, otherwise I’d say Richard should play all the great roles of Cary Grant and Gregory Peck (including Gen. MacArthur). A girl may dream…

        • Well, I have to say these classic films strike a chord with me. I miss that old Hollywood glamour, frankly, when men were men and women were women and vive la difference! 😉 And there were interesting stories and characters that didn’t rely on CGI carrying the film.

          And indeed a girl may dream . . . maybe I will have to write a story about a sexy, charming cat burglar who strongly resembles a certain actor we know . . . I’ve been working on my highwayman story again but my brain is saying it needs a rest.

  2. I have to admit I haven seen this movie either. Looks like I’ve a lot of catching up to do as far as Cary Grant films go! RA would make one sexy cat burglar! In black from top to toe: yummy! 🙂 Who could play the Grace Kelly role?

    • I do love those classics. Like RA’s work, I can watch them again and again. You’d probably want RA to burgle you as long as you were still up when he arrived in the dark of the night. 😉 As for the choice to play the Grace Kelly role . . . the American beauty with the passionate nature beneath her cool exterior, likely in her early to mid-20s, although we never know exactly how old she is. Have to give that some thought.

      • The only Cary Grant film I watched multiple times is The Philadelphia Story! I loved James Stewart and CG in it! Wasn’t sure about Katharine Hepburn, couldn’t really decide whether she was a bit OTT or just getting the character right.. But the two guys were fantastic especially in the scene where the drunk JS visits CG (“Sorry I’ve got the hiccups”- he is absolutely hilarious! ). One of my all time favourite scenes in a movie! 🙂

        • That’s a great movie! Kate had a very mannered style of acting at times. I love her but she was different from a lot of other leading ladies of her time. She starred opposite Cary in several movies. One of my favs is Bringing Up Baby, a screwball comedy that wasn’t that well-received when it came out, but has since been given classic status. Another favorite of mine with Cary is Arsenic and Old Lace. He is hilarious in that. I love Jimmy Stewart, too. 😀

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