Daily Archives: April 9, 2012

Peaches! And other things . . .

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I know. They weren't the peaches you were expecting . . .

How about some nice chesticles and abs??

Uhmmmmmmmmmm . . .

A bowl of peaches with colors enhanced. The Ca...

Peaches!!! Oh, still not what you were expecting. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Oooh, hey--lookie! Peaches . . . . as only RA can provide.

The Light and the Dark Sides: Who we and Richard really are

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Who is Fedoralady/Ladywriter/angie long? While I have never attempted to go incognito online, many people who are actually acquainted with me would likely be surprised to discover this blog and my fanfic and vids. They have a certain image of me in their minds and it is the real me. But so is the blogger, the fiction writer, the vidder, the unabashed admirer of Richard Armitage.

They are all the “real” me. Some people may not like certain discoveries they make about me. But I am who I am, and that is more than just what you see on the surface.  I am more than a half-century old now, and I have gotten pretty comfortable in my own skin. I have strengths and weaknesses, good habits and bad ones.  Heck, if I was perfect, I would be boring. But I do keep trying to be a better person.

When I was studying art in high school, I remember my teacher strongly emphasizing the use of lights and darks in the creation of a drawing. It the sketch was only one or the other, too much of the same tone, than it simply wasn’t as pleasing to the eye. It needed the dark to balance out the light, you see.

This drawing by freshpics shows excellent use of lights and darks.

That’s what I love about Richard’s acting. No character is all good or all bad; they have many shades, many nuances, their lights and darks. That’s what makes them so compelling, so memorable. That’s why we care about them, how we can empathize with the “baddies,” want to know more about their past and envision what their future will be like. That’s why we keep them alive in our videos and stories and poetry. The scriptwriters may do them in, but we know they have been Loved Into Being, achieving So Not Dead status.

I don’t “know” Richard Armitage anymore than many of you “know” me. We simply have to interpret what we see and hear in interviews and his messages, and by random quotes made by those with whom he works.  I don’t know him, I probably will never meet him, but I know that I like and admire and respect the human being he appears to be.

Richard in his public persona--charming, funny, modest and a bit flirtatious. I had my teacher persona, my journalist persona and now my blogger persona. All different and yet, all me.

Deutsch: Richard Armitage gibt Fans Autogramme...

Deutsch: Richard Armitage gibt Fans Autogramme auf dem Roten Teppich bei den BAFTA TV Awards in London am 20. Mai 2007 English: Richard Armitage is giving autographs to fans on the red carpet at the BAFTA TV Awards in London, May 20, 2007 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

He has inspired me in so many ways: through his dedication to his craft, his strong work ethic, his generosity with his fellow actors, his sense of humor,  his modesty, just to name a few. And yes, his masculine beauty, his natural elegance and grace, and that marvelous instrument of a voice all move and inspire and compell me.  He is the stuff of which dreams and fantasies are made. He is my creative muse who provides catharsis and escape when I need it. He’s not perfect, either–but he certainly is interesting. We don’t know everything about him–which simply heightens the mystique.

Thank you, Richard Armitage, for being you–whomever and whatever you may be.

As for me, I am still discovering just who I am. Sometimes, it surprises me. But it is never boring.

Meet one of RA’s TH co-stars: the charming, talented Lee Pace

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Lee Pace first came on my radar in the period comedy, Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day. 

Cover of "Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day ...

Cover via Amazon

Lee Pace in "Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day."

He was tall, dark and attractive and he definitely caught my attention. I  thought he was a Brit, but it turns out he was born in Oklahoma and spent much of his childhood in Saudi Arabia (his dad was an oilman). On returning to the US, the family lived in New Orleans and Houston, Texas. Lee is a graduate of the prestigious Julliard School and has done work in television, on stage and on screen. I never saw either of his television series (Wonderfalls and Pushing Daisies), but the latter has been quite a cult classic and I hope to check it out in the not-too-distant future.

Wonderfalls

Wonderfalls (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Day 177: Pushing Daisies

Day 177: Pushing Daisies (Photo credit: tsmall)

Lee’s breakthrough performance was the 2003 film made for Showtime, Soldier’s Girl, based on a true and tragic incident. Lee plays a transgender showclub performer who becomes involved with a young soldier, later beaten to death by a fellow GI.  It’s the sort of story that could have been handled in a cheap and exploitative manner; instead, the relationship is explored with great sensitivity and it’s beautifully acted by Lee and Troy Garrity as Barry, the soldier who unexpectedly falls in love with someone very different.

Lee is six feet, three inches tall with a deep voice.   Yet, he creates the illusion that he is a woman. He doesn’t come across as a drag queen with a lot of exaggerated mannerisms, but a very tall, willowy and graceful lady, and it is easy to see why the soldier would be attracted to Calpernia. Lee, already a lean fellow, lost 25 lbs. to play the role. He performance was nominated for several awards, including a Golden Globes.

Lee Pace as Calpernia, the transgender showgirl in "A Soldier's Girl."

In 2006, Lee appeared in the fantasy adventure film The Fall, playing Roy, a silent movie era stuntman who is partially paralyzed in a fall. With both heart and body fractured, Roy is befriended by a little girl recuperating from a broken arm in the same hospital. He entertains her with tales of strange mythical heroes and their far-flung exploits. It is one of the most visually stunning films I have ever seen (I have now ordered it on DVD) shot over a couple of years in a half-dozen different countries.

A gif that shows Lee also knows how to rock the guyliner.

”]Cover of "The Fall (+ BD Live) [Blu-ray]&...

Lee has also appeared in such films as  The Ceremony, When in Rome, A Single Man and has a role in Breaking Dawn Part 2.

He will be playing the elf king Thranduil in both of the upcoming Hobbit films.   He just might give Leggy some competition in the hearthrob elf category.  Lee’s trademarks are his bushy eyebrows and his shy, nervous but charming demeanor.

Lomelindi88's rendering of Lee as Elf King Thranduil in "The Hobbit."

Blue, blue, blue Monday: Not a bad thing when RA is involved

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Those beautiful, keen blue eyes . . .

“A pretty man came to me, never seen eyes so blue . . .”

Eyes that can hypnotize . . .

Smouldering, intense azure gaze . . .

“Being tender and open is beautiful . . .” Words of wisdom and images I love

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When I was a kid, I had a reputation for being “tender-hearted” and “sensitive.” I just knew I felt things deeply, things both happy and sad. When something moved me, tears would often come to my eyes.

I got teased about that. Nobody wants to be called a “crybaby”.  So I tried to internalize a lot of my emotions, not always very successfully.

Well, I am a great deal older, with a bit more callous on my skin. But I still find myself moved by certain songs, certain images, certain words. When I saw Paris for the first time, I found tears filling my eyes. And I certainly wasn’t sad.

Mr. Armitage with his amazing talent has the ability to do just that–to make me feel deeply, to stir emotions and move me to tears. And I don’t think that is a bad thing at all.

I ran across this quote by actress/musician Zooey Deschanel and just had to share it with you, along with some photos of other things that I allow myself to truly be affected by.

Ste. Chapelle in Paris. A perfect jewelbox.

A person, place or moment of beauty is a joy forever . . .