Category Archives: early roles

Want some early Armitage emoting?

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Thank you, Nadia, for the heads up on this black & white film trailer at Vimeo featuring a young Richard Armitage and an actress named Jennifer Taylor Lawrence.

“Staged” was filmed in London at the Hackney Empire Theatre in 1999. The trailer was uploaded by Darren Denison, who directed the film. Denison said Richard and his co-star, who were chosen out of hundreds of applications by actors and talent agencies, were “amazing to work with.” Take a gander.    Would love to hear your thoughts!

(If you have RealPlayer, you can also download the trailer to your own computer.)

The link to the trailer is here:
                https://vimeo.com/56946099
I suspect as RA’s star continues to rise, we will see more of this sort of thing, of photos, trailers, et al. from his earlier career appearing online. Personally, I am waiting for the Cleopatra DVD to get a new cover, touting RA as one of its “stars.”  🙂
This is Richard with his co-star in the stage production "Use Me as Your Cardigan." He does a bit of smouldering in this trailer, too.

This is Richard with his co-star in another role, in the stage production “Use Me as Your Cardigan.” He does a bit of smouldering in this trailer for “Staged,” too.

New Year’s Resolutions, courtesy of Mr. A

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I am not very good at keeping my New Year’s resolutions. But I thought of some I’d like to tackle. Richard and his ChaRActers helped me out with the illustrations. Some are very tongue-in-cheek and others more serious. Here are some of them:

 

coldfeet_01newtears

 

 

rh203_115rechout

 

 

BeFunky_A90WYJ2CYAEbBWelistener

 

 

 

dr track bluenewyears4

 

41: RA’s climacteric year?

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Climacteric: (noun) 1. a critical period. 2. A year in which important changes in health, fortune, etc. are held by some theories to occur, such as one’s 65th year. 3. The period of maximum respiration in a fruit, in which it becomes fully ripened.  (Also refers to a physiological period involving a decrease in reproductive capacity in men and women, culminating, in women, in menopause).

In 2004, the year he turned 33, Richard Armitage (unexpectedly, it would seem, from the BBC’s standpoint) became something of an “overnight sensation” in the UK after captivating a large contingent of females with his performance as the sober Victorian mill owner capable of a “foolish passion” in North & South.  Of course, the man had been toiling for years as a struggling actor, doing DIY work for friends and taking front of house jobs to make ends meet while trying to find that the success that seemed to elude him–therefore “overnight sensation” in quotes.

 

Thornton became an iconic role for Richard Armitage, with many audience members choosing him as their ideal romantic hero.  More television roles came. His first starring role after N&S,  caring air emergency doctor Alex Track in the series The Golden Hour, was short-lived, but he ended up stealing the show as the beautiful, conflicted henchman Guy of Gisborne in Robin Hood and making us fall in love with an enigmatic spy named Lucas North in Spooks.  There were other television roles, too, including the charismatic businessman with a dark side, John Mulligan in Moving On.

Then came the tough, yet tender and sexy-as-hell sergeant John Porter in Strike Back, not to mention the various audiobooks, advertisements, TV narrations and other jobs our workaholic fit into his schedule–and his first significant role in a blockbuster, the sinister Hydra spy Heinz Kruger in Captain America.

 

 

His fandom continued to grow and his talent seemed to go from strength to strength. Even when fans hated what was done to some of his character *holds up hand* they rarely faulted him on the quality of his performances and the versatility he continued to show in his roles.

Richard Armitage turned 41 this past August. And he seems to be in the midst of another truly climacteric year–one of gigantic proportions, I suspect.  Because he’s about to appear in one of, if not the biggest of the big films this holiday season, helmed by no less than Sir Peter Jackson, beloved director of the spectacularly successful film trilogy LOTR. It’s a film that has its own built-in, wildly enthusiastic audience (as witnessed by Comic-Con). And Richard is undeniably one of its stars, right up there with Martin Freeman and Sir Ian McKellen.

 

 

 

The publicity machine for The Hobbit is well underway–and before the film arrives in theaters, we’ve got lots of Richard to look forward to, in tie-in books, in magazine and television interviews and more, a veritable RA/Thorin bonanza. And I am not complaining.

John Thornton was Richard’s first iconic role; surely Thorin Oakenshield, the brave, fierce, charismatic dwarf warrior will be his next, and one viewed by a much, much larger audience across the world.  In this climacteric year, Richard Armitage is going to become very well-known, and I suspect many audience members will want to know what’s underneath all that yak hair and makeup.  And what else this impressive actor has appeared in. Ah, the pleasures that await them!

And I, for one, am delighted at the thought of it, of the thought of fans of all ages, both sexes, all nationalities, etc. discovering more about our wonderful RA.  I see his fan base growing and diversifying with his starring role in The Hobbit. If any actor deserves that sort of attention, it’s Richard Armitage. His talent, his intelligence, his dedication to his roles, his professionalism, the intensity he brings to every project–and the fact he is such a worthwhile human being on top of it all–makes my heart sing with gladness for this man.

I would say year 41 is truly turning out to be climacteric for our beautiful guy. Who will also be gracing screens as schoolteacher Gary Morris in Black Sky in 2013. What’s up next for RA? I don’t know, but I do know I will be along for the ride, come what may.

Vive Richard Armitage!!

Simply Sublime, that Serendipity Should Send RA to Me . . .

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I do love a bit of alliteration.

I mentioned that “splendiferous” is one of my favorite words in the English language.  To that I would have to add “sublime,” a word Hermione Norris, Richard’s co-star in Spooks and Cold Feet, used to describe him. Sublime: of such excellence, grandeur and beauty as to inspire great admiration or awe. Boy, did she hit the nail on the head or what? (I do love a smart, insightful woman who can also kick some major arse and look stylish doing it.)

The sublime Richard Armitage as the sublime Lucas North.

I am also very fond of the word “serendipity.” Serendipity: the act of finding something valuable or delightful when you are not looking for it. The occurrence or development of events by chance in a happy or beneficial way.

I wasn’t looking for a brilliant, masterful, charismatic actor whose performances would touch my heart and soul. I wasn’t actively seeking out a man whose physical beauty would take my very breath away, an individual whose qualities as a human being–his kindness, thoughtfulness, modesty, groundedness, sense of humour and more–would stir such admiration and respect  and affection inside me.  Yet I found all of this by happy accident–by serendipity–one night in 2007 when I turned on my television and a tall, dark, leather-clad henchman came riding into my life.  Oh, I didn’t know all that yet, not then.

But as the months passed, I came to realize what a treasure this (then) somewhat obscure British actor named Richard Crispin Armitage, a fellow who had so completely captured my fancy, truly was.

I have speculated that Richard Armitage comes onto our radar when we need him most, even if we have no idea of it at the time. I was going through a difficult period with the health issues of our parents, Benny’s and mine, and coming to terms with their inevitable decline and loss. Since serendipity led me to discover the sublime RA, we have lost my mother, his father and a young nephew in heartbreaking ways. I have dealt with extended unemployment and a car accident that left me in horrific pain for longer than I care to remember, along with the everyday complications of chronic health conditions.

It’s all been made easier, a little more bearable, through the face, the voice, the words, the performances of Richard Armitage.  I’ve gotten cathartic benefits and the satisfaction of crafting something entertaining, moving, thought-provoking through the creative avenues I have been inspired to pursue–fiction, vidding, fanart, blogging–revolving around this very special man. And I have benefitted from the similar effect he has on so many others.

An exuberant RA with one of the scale doubles for The Hobbit during a fund-raising event in Wellington. I give YOU two big thumbs up, Mr. Armitage.

And the friends, oh! the wonderful, bright, witty, intelligent, talented, creative, compassionate friends I have made across the world, thanks to that serendipity that brought RA onto my radar.

It’s simply–sublime. Many thanks to Richard Armitage and to  you all for making my life a happier, more beautiful and creative one.

Cats! Armitage & Otherwise

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Ah, I would recognize those thighs anywhere, methinks.

Such a cute and charming feline!

Callie said Thumper had gotten quite enough blog space of late, and so I thought better share some artwork featuring our own butterscotch, cream and chocolate confection of a kitty.

There’s no place like it.

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Home, that is.

Dorothy’s magical red slippers in The Wizard of Oz. (courtesy of drafthouse.com)

I didn’t have to tap my ruby red slippers together three times to get here–just climb ever so carefully in and out of a Chevy Traverse a few times and then a dusty Jeep  for the final leg of the journey. Finally, with the assistance of a quad cane and my dear hubby, I navigated across the yard, past the enthusiastic greetings of Rascal and Elvis and up the steps to the deck. A few more steps, and I was home.

When you aren’t feeling well, there really is no place quite like home. As much as I loved those glorious views I shared with you all, and the time I spent with my darling sister, I stretched out last night with a most satisfied sigh on my own bed, cradled by the memory foam topper.

Benny kindly unloaded the vehicle, brought me some aspirin and reminded me to stick a pillow under my ankle. He’d already fitted a foam tube to the fat purple toe and taped it to the one next door while we were still in Orange Beach. Really, with a broken “little piggy” there isn’t much else you can do, except to give it time and try not to aggravate the injury.

I was so exhausted I fell asleep early, woke up enough to bid him a good day at work and then drifted back to sleep again, cozy and comfy under the quilt and throw, the little heater keeping the bedroom nice and snug.

It’s been almost a year since he had to tend to me and a busted body part. Thank goodness it was only the toe this time around and not my tailbone. And thank goodness it happened at the end of my visit and the beginning. There is always something to be thankful for, isn’t there?

As always, I am thankful for all of you, and for the delightful human being who brought us together in the first place.

Because there’s nobody quite like him, is there?

He’s just what we’d been waiting for . . .

RA’s Heartbreakers: Rogues, Cons & Bad Boys

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Philip Durant, the husband with the roving eye and a potential murder suspect in Agatha Christie’s Ordeal by Innocence.

Lee Preston, the firty-girty lifeguard with the irresistible charm and an inability to be faithful to one woman in “Cold Feet.”

The charming Stage Door Johnny, Percy Courtenay, who swept future Edwardian musical hall star Marie Lloyd of her feet in “Marie Lloyd.”

John Mulligan, the boy from the wrong side of the tracks turned successful businessman–and, perhaps, more in :”Moving On.”

Heinz Kruger, crafty murderous spy for the evil Hydra in “Captain America.”

Percy and his angel face after shaving.

Dr. Track, Catholicon: TAE Word for the Day

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catholicon: (noun) universal remedy; panacea.

Dr. Alex Track, Richard’s character in The Golden Hour, is the caring, determined, dedicated physician who soars high in the sky in a heli as part of the emergency medical air service.  He’s just the doctor you’d want to come to your rescue, to be at your bedside, to give you a reassuring hug, to smile into your eyes as you awaken from a deep sleep.

Surely Dr. Track is an excellent catholicon, good for whatever may ail you. And when I am feeling low, I like to imagine Dr. Track bringing his medical kit to my side. Such thoughts are quite the panacea, let me tell you.  I should also mention he’s quite gorgeous and looks a treat in bright orange coveralls, no mean feat.

Of course, the same thing could be said of Mr. A himself–he is certainly capable of cheering up an awful lot of us and somehow making everything much better, isn’t he??

A miscellany of RA for a Sunday afternoon

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Here are some bits and bobs of Richard in some of his smaller/earlier roles and RA himself. I hope all are having a good Sunday/Monday.  Benny killed yet another rattlesnake today, this time in my parents’ front yard close to the same spot he found one before. A big ol’ rattler with 13 rattles. *shivers*  Have I mentioned I really do not like snakes at all?

 

 

He looks beautifully peeved here, methinks.