Category Archives: Richard’s word of the day

TAE Word for the Day: My man ain’t no fanfaron!


Nothing wrong with being a fan or aficionado. But you really don’t want to be a fanfaron. Or be a fan of a fanfaron.

FANFARON: a boaster or a braggart. From the French fanfaron, from the Spanish fanfarron, perhaps from Arabic farfar (talkative), of expressive origin. The words fanfaronade and fanfare have the same origin. Earliest use in English language traced back to 1622.

Fortunately, Richard is many things, but one thing he isn’t is a fanfaron.   Put it down to typical English self-effacement, to a very proper upbringing by John and Margaret, to something innate–Rich is not a lad to go around tooting his own horn. Instead, there is a sort of quiet confidence in his stillness. He’s the thoughtful, grown-up fellow who doesn’t feel the need to try to impress us.

And there’s that rather adorable–if occasionally maddening–tendency to downplay his talents and abilities.   I wouldn’t take a hundred boastful egocentric Kanye West types for one man who’s the real thing. Richard Armitage: my man ain’t no fanfaron! And I love him all the more for it.





Holey-moley, He’s a Lollapalooza!: TAE Word for the Day


lollapalooza (noun): an extraordinary or unusual thing, person or event; an exceptional example or circumstance.

(Also the name of a certain giant rock tour here in the United States.)

Really, can we say Richard, our extraordinarily talented, unusually attractive, amazingly charismatic and exceptionally gentlemanly fellow, is truly a lollapalooza of a guy? I think so.



As a lollapalooza, Richard, you really do ROCK.


Armitage’s Don Juan: Lee Preston, Flirt of the First Order


Our word for the day is Don Juan (noun): an obsessed womanizer.  See Lee  Preston, lifeguard, (very) personal trainer and total flirty-girty in series 5 of Cold Feet.  Lee has never met a woman he wouldn’t be happy to seduce, methinks. And he’s very good at it, with that deceptively angelic face, those puppy-dog eyes. engaging grins and the killer bod.




The original Don Juan was, of course, a legendary 14th century Spanish nobleman, who devoted his life to seducing women. His story has been portrayed by many authors and composers, amongst them Moliere, Mozart, Byron and Shaw. But did any of their incarnations of the legendary lover wear midnight blue Speedos and look like this?

I think not.




One of the things I find delicious about this character is that the actor behind it is so gorgeous, sexy and charismatic he could have been a very successful womanizer, a veritable Don Juan, like Lee, if he so chose that road. But he isn’t and he didn’t and I love him all the more for it.

As for Lee, I do think he could be a heck of a good time for a girl–as long as she took proper precautions and never expected more than a good time. Mr. Preston is not marriage or long-term partnership material.

But he is awfully pretty (even if I prefer the more mature beauty of Mr. Armitage these days).


Coincidence? I don’t know. But it’s PERFECT.


It’s a blustery, cold, wet day here in Lower Alabama. Upper Alabama just may get some wet snow out of this massive storm system moving across the Southeast.

A day to stay in with a big mug of coffee and do some Richarding! 😀 Last night I was joking on Twitter about feeling like Pavlov’s dog. You know, any sight or hearing or mention of a certain TDHBEW, and I practically start drooling.


So what did I see in my inbox this morning? My A.Word.A.Day email. And what was the word, you ask? Heeheehee.

Salivate: (verb) (1) to show great relish in anticipation of something desirable. (2) to produce saliva.  From the Latin salivare (to salivate). Earliest documented use: 1669.

Let me say I laughed aloud. Coincidence? Fate? Who knows. But it’s a perfect word for the effect Mr. A and his chaRActers have on me. I can feel my eyes light up, my lips part as I softly, rapturously exhale,  a fatuous grin crossing my face when I see images like this:





So, do you salivate when you see/hear/contemplate Mr. A and his sensational selection of alluring, adorable, amazing ChaRActers?

Such a Bonny, Couthie Lad: TAE Word for the Day



Richard as his usual friendly and genial self on the BAFTA red carpet.

couthie: (adj.) agreeable; genial; kindly.

Couthie stems from the Old English word cuth, originally meaning “to know.” It arose in the 1700s in Scotland in the sense of “agreeable.”

When I think of Richard in his encounters with fans, whether on the red carpet, or outside of a TV studio, on a film set, or otherwise, I think of how sweet and pleasant he always appears to be. I’d say that bonny lad is downright couthie.


Richard signing autographs for fans at Comic-Con July 2012.Courtesy of cambear

Richard signing autographs for fans at Comic-Con July 2012.
Courtesy of cambear

Thank you, Richard, for being so couthie to all the Ardent Armitage Aficionados out there!


Richard reading fan's sign at Hobbit event in Toronto.

Richard reading fan’s sign at Hobbit event in Toronto.

Richard with blogger fan on Black Sky set.Courtesy of awkwardcelebencounters

Richard with blogger fan on Black Sky set.
Courtesy of awkwardcelebencounters

I will not abjure from my Armitage avidity: TAE Words For the Day


(Or abjure from alliteration, it appears.)

Yes, folks, it’s the day after Christmas and you get not one, but TWO words for the day here at The Armitage Effect.

Abjure: (verb, tr.) 1. to avoid or to abstain from. 2. to renounce under oath.

Avidity (noun) 1. enthusiasm or dedication. 2. eagerness; greediness.

Being without electricity for several hours due to the nasty storms that moved through last night, I was forced to abjure from any Richarding online (in the sense of being forced by circumstances beyond my control to abstain from it).

I certainly never seem to purposefully avoid Richarding. And if Richarding were made illegal–oh, don’t even go there!–and I was asked to renounce all Richarding–

Well. As I said, I do not even want to go there.

Avidity for Armitage? Oh yes, that I will gladly claim.  I am an enthusiastic, eager, dedicated and ardent Armitage aficionado.


I try very hard not to be greedy about it. But when we are in the midst of a long drought, one does long for anything–a new pic or an old one that’s been unearthed; a snippet from an interview, a fresh quote about him from one of his fellow cast or crew members.

Of course, we’ve been inundated in recent weeks with Armitage goodies–so much I admit I haven’t kept up at times. And, not wanting too many spoilers for the film, I started avoiding (abjuring!) watching the new Hobbit spots.  At times I feel a tad overwhelmed–but I am not complaining. I will simply stretch out my enjoyment.

But I can never stay away from Mr. Armitage’s many charms–his talent, charisma, beauty, humor, sex appeal, sweetness–and the chance to share them and discuss them with fellow aficionados for very long.

I just can’t abjure from my Armitage avidity, it seems.




Armitage (and Sir Guy) do not leave one algid: TAE Word for the Day


Algid: (adjective) cold; chilly.   A late Renaissance term,  algid is derived from the term algidus, meaning “cold.”

It’s downright cold across much of the US right now and, I suspect, lots of other places. Even here where our winters can be quite mild, a northerly wind is battering against the house in gusts and it’s certainly beginning to feel a lot like Christmas. Which is just fine with me.

After all, whenever I want to ward off the algid weather, I have only to look to Mr. Armitage and his various ChaRActers to warm me up nicely.

And who better than our man of the day, Sir Guy? Happy Guyday Friday and don’t get too algid!





RA: Definitely Svelte: TAE Word for the Day


Svelte: (adjective): (1) Slender, especially gracefully slender in figure. (2) Suave; blandly urbane.

Looking at recent photos of Mr. Armitage, in prime form and minus all the padding provided by his Thorin gear, one can only describe him as svelte. He’s slender, but not skinny; he know from the reports of those who got hugged by him on the Black Sky set he’s “solid” beneath his clothes. 

And graceful? Ah, the man is absolute poetry in motion. The dancer’s poise is always evident.

Suave, particularly in terms of a man, means charming, confident and elegant. Remind you of anyone?

I can’t say I think of the dear fellow as “bland,” but urbane (“courteous and refined in manner”)? Oh, yes. Every bit of it.

And didn’t he look and act the part of the suave, elegant, courteous gentleman at the Wellington premiere? Ladies and gentlemen, I rest my case. Richard Armitage is definitely one swell and svelte guy.

He’s downright balsamaceous, that boy: TAE Word for the Day


(And I’d like to hear him say that word, too.)

Balsamaceous: (adjective): Possessing healing or restorative properties.

The word derives from the Latin balsamum, “resin of the balm tree.” The substance is historically celebrated for its aroma and healing properties.

Dr. Track is a healer by profession, and with his steadfast dedication and delightful bedside manner, he certainly makes us feel better.

And whilst John Porter is a tough soldier by trade with kickass skills, his gentleness and compassion helped Katie through the trauma of her captivity even as he worked to free her. This balsamaceous hero is tops in our books.

Our Victorian hero, Mr. Thornton, restores our belief in foolish passion and sweet romance. Surely he’s been a balm to many a troubled spirit.

Dear Harry Kennedy. His sweet, sunny, nurturing nature–perhaps a reflection of his CReAtor’s own lovely character?–cannot fail to bring a smile to our faces and a warm tug on our hearts.

Just a few examples of Mr. A’s balsamaceous characters. But of course, the most balsamaceous of them all is the man himself.

Lovely, funny, brilliant, modest, insightful, endearing, charismatic . . . how you touch our hearts, minds and souls, Richard Armitage.

Elysian Armitage: TAE Word for the Day


Elysian: (adjective): blissful; delightful. Of, or relating to, or characteristic of heaven or paradise.

From the Latin Elysium, from the Greek elysion pedyon (Elysian plain/ fields). In Greek mythology, Elysium (or Elysian fields) was the final resting place for the souls of heroes and the virtuous after their deaths. Earliest documented use: 1579.

Richard Armitage manages to evoke feelings within us which I believe can be described as truly elysian. Surely our endorphin levels are boosted when we see his image, hear his voice, read his words? We experience positive emotions; our pain seems to lessen, our bliss seems to increase. We are inspired and excited in such a manner it takes our breath away.

RA  and his cast of ChaRActers can make us downright euphoric. It seems as if we see a glimpse of heaven itself in those fathomless blue eyes, in the sweetness of his smiles and the joy of his laughter.

I’ll just say no to the giblets: TAE Word for the Day


Giblets: (noun) the heart, liver, gizzard, and the like, of a fowl, often cooked separately.

Giblet gravy with turkey or chicken giblets and chopped hard-boiled eggs is quite popular here in the south as an accompaniment to turkey and cornbread dressing each Thanksgiving. But it will not be on the table chez Fedoralady.

Giblet gravy. Courtesy of

Fedoralady does not do giblet gravy or indeed, giblet anything.  Growing up on a poultry farm, she ate a great deal of chicken. Baked, barbecued, fried, chicken salad, chicken and dumplings, chicken and rice, chicken casseroles.You get the drift.  But when her mama prepared fried chicken livers and gizzards, she beat a hasty retreat. Couldn’t stand the smell, much less the taste. Hubby feels the same way.   We like gravy–white milk gravy, brown gravy. Just no giblets, please.

Fedoralady  hopes if Mr. Armitage ever has occasion to dine at her home for Thanksgiving (she realizes this is highly, highly unlikely but it’s fun to imagine) that he is not an aficionado of said fowl parts.

Now, cranberry sauce? That’s another thing. Love it. Hubby will fight you for the last dinner roll and serving of cranberry sauce.  In fact, he’d much rather have the cranberry sauce and rolls than the turkey and dressing! Better buy extra.  (I’m afraid we tend to go with Ocean Spray’s canned sauce every year instead of the homemade route. It’s what we both grew up eating.)

Now you’re talking. Cranberry sauce, courtesy of

I just know that I would love to have the chance to (covertly) watch Mr. Armitage eat. I find myself writing scenes where his character is dining because it’s such a pleasure watching him enjoy his food and drink.  So, hey, let’s look at some photos of Richard/his characters eating! See, I can even work him into a giblets post. 😉

Richard and crew members for Spooks chowing down on sandwiches in a behind-the-scenes screencap courtesy of RANet.

John Mulligan snacking at Ellie’s house. Screencaps  courtesy of RANet.

Poor Sweetie John is a bit discomfited as he tries to finish off his breakfast sausage in Sparkhouse.

Fork porn. I love it. That is all.

Ogling Armitage: TAE Word for the Day


OK, when I opened this email for the day, I had a sort of Beavis and Butthead moment. A stupid grin on my face. Giggling under my breath. Snorting a bit. Was this a word I would be using at TAE?

You betcha!

Ogle: (verb) to look at amorously, flirtatiously or impertinently. To eye, look at or stare at.

Ogle traces its origins to Lower German oeglen, “to look at,” but ultimately comes from a now extinct word for “eye,” oog.

Do I ogle Richard Armitage? Is the Pope Catholic? Does the sun still rise in the east and set in the west? Do I have a strange-but-lovable three-legged black and white tuxedo cat with a Hitler mustache?

A resounding “yes” to all of the above!  I mean, how can I, a sane, red-blooded heterosexual female with extremely good taste in men not do a bit (OK, a LOT) of ogling of such a magnificent specimen as this??

Both dressed . . .

And undressed!

And the rear view is awfully nice . . . *sigh* (click on photo if Sir Guy is not moving, ladies and gents)

Those amazingly long, lean, muscular dancer’s thighs!

Need I say more?

Look at me, I’ve got a case of body language . . . of body language . . . from ogling the fabulous Richard Armitage and his cast of ChaRActers. How about you? 😉

Harry’s Got That Gemutlichkeit: TAE Word for the Day


Gemutlichkeit: (noun) warm friendliness; coziness, comfortableness.  The word comes from German word gemutlich (comfortable, cozy). Earliest documented use: 1892.

If “troth” made me think of John Standring, this word made me think of a certain tall, lanky handsome stranger with a penchant for striped jumpers.


I think of the warmth of that dazzling smile with which he greets the vicar and Alice on their visit to Sleepy Cottage; of his sweet and sunny personality and how good it must be to cuddle with someone like Mr. Kennedy.

Harry exudes gemutlichkeit.

I can easily imagine a cold winter’s eve, curling up beneath a quilt on a comfy sofa in front of a cozy fire, head resting on one broad and reliable jumper-clad shoulder,  listening to Harry read aloud in that delicious chocolate voice . . .



I hope you find some gemutlichkeit in your life this holiday season, my friends.

The Ultimate Nonesuch of a Celeb Crush: TAE Word for the Day


Nonesuch (noun): a person or thing without an equal; a person or thing declared as perfect or excellent.

From the Old English nan,  from ne (not) + swelce/swylce. Earliest documented use: 290.

If I were trying to create my very own Perfect Celebrity Crush from scratch, what would I include in the mix?

Stunning good looks, fab physique and sex appeal to spare?


Talent–multi-faceted, versatile, amazing–to spare?



A dedication to his craft that brings such intensity to his performances?



Intelligent, articulate and insightful, a pleasure to see/hear/read in interviews?



A wonderful sense of humor?



An endearing  boy-next-door vibe, gentlemanly, polite, modest, humble, well-grounded and generous of spirit?


A celeb who truly appreciates his fans and treats them well?

courtesy of awkwardcelebencounteres


And that, ladies and gents, are some of the reasons Richard Armitage is my choice of the absolute nonesuch of a celebrity crush.

Splendiferous Armitage: TAE Word for the Day


This is one of my favorite words in the English language. So I was completely delighted to see it arrive in my inbox this morning.

Splendiferous (adj.) magnificent; fine.  Splendiferous is an elaboration of the word splendid (gorgeous, sumptuous, dazzling) but owes its roots to the Latin splendere “to shine” and ferre “to bear.”

Surely, amongst the adjectives we have found so appropriate to describe our dearest RA, we must include the word “splendiferous?”

Porter, a splendiferous hero–brave, resourceful, relentless, yet tender, too. Who would not wish for such a courageous soldier to come to their rescue?

Dearest Harry Kennedy–funny, sweet, sunny-natured, and a man who knows a good woman when he meets her. Simply splendiferous as the handsome stranger we’d all like to move into our neighborhood.

Sir Guy, so regal on horseback as he solemnly rides through the gates of Nottingham to meet Jasper and the prince’s men. Sir Guy, knowing the city is about to be burned and that he will return to almost certain death rather than leave Marian’s side. I’d call that splendiferous.

That kiss? Oh, nothing less than absolutely, positively–splendiferous.

Lucas–our splendiferous spy, no matter what TPTB tried to do to this wonderful character so beautifully crafted by Richard.

Of course, there’s the man himself–intelligent, multi-talented, insightful, versatile, good-humored, modest, humble, gentlemanly, charming, drop-dead gorgeous and sexy as all get out. Such a splendiferous example of masculinity, is he not?? An all=around splendiferous human being.

I know everybody’s probably seen this one, but it is one of my most viewed, most liked videos and you might say it has a touch of the splendiferous in it–after all, who is the focus of it? And Elizaveta’s song is so infectious . . .