Tag Archives: Alfred Hitchcock

‘A concentrating actor’: Richard on his acting & the challenges of The Hobbit

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 From Facebook. Thanks to Ali at Richard Armitage Net for the link. Well worth reading, although I found myself sorely tempted to edit out some typos. 😉 How do you spell Oakenshield??
One of the most interesting aspects is we now know RA definitely doesn’t think of himself as a Method actor.
Having read Alfred Hitchcock’s fascinating bio recently and learned how he wanted a leading man with sexual charisma and a dark, edgy, dangerous feel (and wasn’t always able to get what he wanted due to studio issues), I’ve envisioned RA in a Hitchcock film. After all, one of his favorite films is one of Hitch’s-“North by Northwest.”
However, Hitch was not particularly fond of Method actors, who frequently tried his patience (he actually had more affection and respect for the acting profession than has been reported; after all, his daughter, Patricia, became an actress).   However, I think the director would have found working with RA very rewarding indeed . . .
Alfred Hitchcock, head-and-shoulders portrait,...

Alfred Hitchcock, head-and-shoulders portrait, facing right (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey – Richard Armitage (Thorin Okensheild) DVD Q
by Magnavision Home Video (Notes) on Wednesday, April 3, 2013 at 12:44am

QUESTION: What was the greatest challenge for you to act in this film?

RICHARD ARMITAGE: I think the greatest challenge of taking on Thorin was to attempt to make such a physical transformation feel real.  Our body shapes change.  We wore a considerable amount of padding, huge boots and a facial prosthetic which at first was kind of limiting. It meant that you had to animate your own face more to make sure that the expression that you were feeling inside was being transported through the makeup. So that was a physical challenge. In terms of the character I think layering the character with this inner fear of driving sickness and madness and the horror of what happened in the mountain; but at the same time show his dwarves the face of a leader that was not afraid, that was something that fascinated me.

QUESTION: Had you been a fan of the books?  Did you grow up reading the series?

RICHARD ARMITAGE: I read “The Hobbit” when I was 11 years old.  Then when I was 13, I was in a stage production, a very local piece of theater with no money. Gollum was made of paper, I remember that very clearly.  I was paid 15 pounds a week.  But that led me on to read “The Lord of the Rings.”  Then I watched the animated version, which was never finished, in the ’80s. I remember being very frustrated that it was never finished.  Then, of course, Peter[Jackson]’s trilogy defined the entire cannon in Middle Earth and that was incredibly fulfilling. I went back to read Rings again after that.

Gollum in Ralph Bakshi's animated version of T...

Gollum in Ralph Bakshi’s animated version of The Lord of the Rings (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

QUESTION: Do you feel that there’s a certain sequence or scene that stands out as your favorite part of the film?

RICHARD ARMITAGE: From my viewing of it, or from my playing in it?

QUESTION: Let’s take it from your viewing.

RICHARD ARMITAGE: The sequence I found incredibly moving is the sequence at the end when the eagles pick up the injured party and take them to safety.  I think all of the ordeals that this crew has gone through and the terrible dilemma that maybe their leader is dead is traumatic.  There’s this incredibles oaring sequence of stillness.  It feels like some kind of salvation; I was moved to tears when I saw that moment because it’s such a relief after such extreme circumstances.

In terms of what was the most important moment for me to film, I think my first time on location,which was being directed by Andy Serkis. I was helicoptered to the top of a mountain where there were no roads or no power cables. There was no sign of any human life there.  There were just three of us dwarves with some food in a backpack. He did 360 degree helicopter shots all day.  So we were left alone in character.  I remember feeling absolutely immersed in the character.  It’s in the prologue; I’m thrilled by that.

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QUESTION: Would you describe yourself as a method actor?

RICHARD ARMITAGE: No I wouldn’t.  I wouldn’t describe myself as a method actor.  I think other people apply that label.  I think I’m a concentrating actor.  So in order to do my work in the course of a day, particularly with a character like this I have to concentrate.  So it’s about staying in the scene, staying with my head in the scene and attempting to keep the character with me.  It doesn’t mean I can’t have a conversation or go and make a cup of coffee. But I actually stay with the character for 18 months.

QUESTION: Other than your own character, who’s your favorite?

RICHARD ARMITAGE: I think my favorite character has to be Mr. Baggins.  He’s the heart of the story.  He’s the character that the audience fall in love with and follow on his journey.  They fear for him, they hope for him.  He’s endearing and hilarious to watch.

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Oh, Richard, it’s not just Bilbo with whom audiences fell in love. Thorin has his own legion of admirers, too. Thank you for all you did to bring him to life for us.   (HD screencaps courtesy of Heirs of Durin and DarkJackal–thanks!)

Aside

John Williams, Grace Kelly and Rene Blancard in TCAT

Lucas North in black ops outfit makes one think what a sexy cat burglar Mr. A would make.

*Screencap RANet, other images Wikipedia)

Can’t you just see RA dressed from head to toe in black,that lithe body moving with the stealth and grace of a great dark feline, slipping in and out of the bedchambers of the wealthy to relieve them of their precious jewels? Wooing the gems (and other articles of attire) right off some unsuspecting and enamored female?

Yes, I’ve been watching Turner Classic Movies again. I cannot begin to tell you how much I love TCM with its uncut, commercial-free films from silents to great movies of more recent vintage. I am always discovering some new gem I have never seen and happily revisiting favorites. Thank you, Ted Turner.

Tonight I re-watched Alfred Hitchcock’s To Catch a ThiefSet on the French Riveria in the mid 1950s, it offers witty dialogue, a romance complete with fireworks and plenty of pretty for the eyes:  gorgeous location scenery, gorgeous attire worn by gorgeous Grace Kelly, not to mention Cary Grant looking suave–and quite gorgeous– in a tux.  There is also a lavish masquerade ball sequence  with attendees in 18th century attire including an anachronistic gold lame gown that must be seen to be believed.

Cary plays  John Roby, a former trapeze artist turned jewel thief (“To my credit, I only stole from those who could afford it”). Roby has been paroled from prison for his service to the French resistance in WW II and grows grapes and flowers to earn his crust these days. Kelly is Frances, a spoiled, bored rich girl ( Frances’ mother: “I wish I hadn’t sent her to that finishing school. I think they did finish her off”) traveling with her delightfully down-to-earth mum.

A series of jewel thefts is taking place on the Riveria and the authorities are sure Roby, “The Cat,” is back in business. Grant has to prove his innocence while trying to avoid the police . . .

It’s a very enjoyable movie and yet again, I found myself casting Richard in the lead role–elegant, intelligent, crafty, alluring with an interesting back story. And he gets the girl and lives past the final credits. I think you can see the appeal I find in that.

Wouldn’t he make a great cat burglar?

One of Mr. A’s fav film classics: North by Northwest

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in North by Northwest, 1959

Cary Grant and Eva Marie Saint. Image via Wikipedia

English: Sign near Mt. Rushmore, South Dakota,...

Cover of "North by Northwest"

Cover of North by Northwest

Mount Rushmore

Mount Rushmore (Photo credit: edebell)

Always delighted to discover a connection with the Toothsome One. When I read a while back in an article that one of his favorite movies was the Hitchcock classic North by Northwest, I was chuffed.

That’s because NbN is also a personal fav of the mister and I.

I am a big Hitchcock fan anyway, and North by Northwest might be the Hitch movie I like the best.

There’s suspense, intrigue, considerable humor, romance and a nail-biting denouement on the faces of Mount Rushmore. There’s the handsome and charismatic Cary Grant in the lead, the inimitable James Mason as the chief baddie and lovely Eva Marie Saint as a classic Hitchcock blonde—cool and calm, but with hints of passion bubbling beneath it all.

Grant plays a “Mad Man,” a successful New York advertising executive named Roger Thornhill. Thornhill is mistaken for a government agent by a ring of international spies and ends up being chased across the country with both the goodies and the baddies in pursuit. Saint is the beautiful and mysterious blonde who comes to his aid.

One of the most exciting and iconic sequences takes place in a Midwestern cornfield with Grant trying to avoid being killed by an unfriendly crop duster.

A personal connection I have with the movie is that part of it is set in Rapid City, S.D. and the afore-mentioned Mount Rushmore.

We lived in Rapid City for several years when we first married. I have visited the hotel featured in several scenes and I’ve been to Mt. Rushmore a number of times—a very impressive sight, I have to say, not matter how often I visited. In fact, from our own backyard, we could see the faint outline of those famous faces. In the summertime when they held the lighting ceremonies, we enjoyed watching the headlights of the cars as they came winding down the mountain.

Of course, they use a Hollywood set for the famous scene set at Mt. Rushmore. But it’s fun imagining Cary Grant, Eva Marie Saint and a dastardly Martin Landau in one of his first movie roles crawling around on Washington’s eyebrows or Lincoln’s nose.

This 1959 production clocks in at 131 minutes of time well spent. Mr. Armitage and I highly recommend it. Now, if I could just manage to have a screening of this classic with a nice bag of hot buttered popcorn shared with a certain TDHBEW . . .