Tag Archives: period drama

They could play relatives.

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So, I was watching The Woman in Black the other night, and seeing Daniel Radcliffe sporting sideburns and wearing sober Victorian garb really reminded me of RA.

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With those keen blue eyes and dark hair, Daniel could play a relative of Mr. Thornton’s–perhaps a younger cousin?

Also, I have to say Daniel’s really grown up into a very handsome, as well as talented, young man.  And such a sweetie!  With a tad of a goofy grin. 😉

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To play the King–or not.

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I took the day off today.  Once I had experienced first-hand the excitement over the RIII announcement early this morning and had written my post (I felt like a reporter again, That felt good), I decided to go to bed. The itchy, sticky, weepy, tired eyes needed a good rest and my head ached as if it did, too.

So for a good 12 hours I stayed away from the computer, TV, Kindle and books. I slept. I played with the cats,who were cuddling together in a pretty adorable way.  I “thunk” a bit.

The eyes do feel better, even if the head is achy.  I’ve just skimmed through all my e-mail–looks like there’s a lot of interest amongst RA bloggers and blog readers about the big announcement. And then Servetus posted this screencap from the BBC documentary that aired tonight showing the results of the facial reconstruction done based on RIII’s skull:

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Is it just me, or does Richard indeed bear a distinct resemblance to the last Plantagenet King?

Of course, assuming the RIII project does get off the ground (and can there possibly be a better time to get this ball rolling than now?? Not to mention the indomitable Philippa Langley is involved!) Richard may not want to play the lead role.

As some have pointed out, he seems to be more interested in getting Richard III’s story told in a more truthful manner than it has been  in the past, rather than in actually playing the part.  Perhaps he would want to play a supporting role such as Warwick. Perhaps he simply wants to work behind the camera as a director to fulfill those particular career ambitions.  Maybe he’d like a supporting role and  be involved in producing/directing. It’s all speculation at the moment.

I just know I want to see this production become a reality, because it’s been such a long-held dream for him. It almost seems destined to be part of his life.

However, if he should end up playing the King, I believe he’d do the role great justice.

He certainly looks the part.

Possible Movie RemAkes: Swashing Some Buckles!

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OK, I freely admit it: I’d love to see Richard in period clothing again. He wears it so well. When I listen to radio dramas such as Clarissa and the Heyer audiobooks, it is so easy for me to imagine RA in frock coats and perfectly tied cravats, riding boots and snug-fitting breeches. Call me shallow; it is, indeed, a pleasant diversion.

But not only do I want to see him in such period costumes, I want to see him in action in such period costume, playing intrepid heroes.  I want to see our athletic, dashing Richard Armitage swashing some buckles, wooing lovely ladies, wielding flintlocks and rapiers with the balletic grace he brings to the role of Thorin.

The Original Hero with a Secret Identity

Before Bruce Wayne/ Batman and Don Diego de la Vega/El Zorro, there was Sir Percy Blakeney, the foppish, foolish British aristocrat who, with the help of a trusted band of fellow aristocrats, secretly helps save souls from Madame Guillotine during the Reign of Terror in the French Revolution.

The Scarlet Pimpernel, the character created by Baroness Orczy in a series of historical adventure-romances first published in 1905, is a master of disguise and escape, a formidable swordsman, quick on his feet and very clever and cunning.

By contrast, Blakeney is a dull-witted, vain, fashion-obsessed creature who takes little interest in world affairs. His beautiful wife, a French actress, Marguerite St. Just,  is unaware of her husband’s secret identity. Circumstances lead him to mistrust her; she, in turn, feels estranged from her cold, dull English husband.

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Anthony Andrews and Jane Seymour in a 1982 television adaptation of Orczy’s work.

The Scarlet Pimpernel (1982 film)

The Scarlet Pimpernel (1982 film) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The story is filled with intrigue, blackmail, lust, revenge, romance, adventure and derring-do all set during a very exciting period in history. I could see Richard having great fun with the dual role, really making us believe in the dull-witted dandy Sir Percy as much as the daring, dashing hero, the Pimpernel. And there’s a sword fight!

Leslie Howard and Merle Oberon as Sir Percy and Marguerite in the 1934 Hollywood version of TSP, considered the definitive adaptation by some fans.

Leslie Howard and Merle Oberon as Sir Percy and Marguerite in the 1934 Hollywood version of TSP, considered the definitive adaptation by some fans.

A physician turned pirate

In 1922, Rafael Sabatini penned a novel entitled Captain Blood, its 17th century hero a quick-witted Irishman who had served as soldier and sailor before settling down to work as a physician in Somerset. After aiding those injured in the Monmouth Rebellion, Blood is arrested, falsely accused of treason and transported to the Caribbean island of Barbados (Jamaica in the 1935 film) to be sold off as a slave.

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The cover of the original edition of Sabatini’s Captain Blood.

Movie poster for the 1935 film version of Sabatini's novel.

Movie poster for the 1935 film version of Sabatini’s novel.

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Peter Blood (Errol Flynn) toe-to-toe with the cruel Caribbean plantation owner (Lionel Atwill).

A wicked plantation owner who purchases him soon discovers Blood’s doctoring skills and he is hired out as a physician, successfully treating the governor for gout. A relationship develops between Blood and the plantation owner’s lovely niece, Arabella, played in the 1935 film by Olivia DeHavilland.  Neither development makes Blood’s owner a happy man.

When Spanish forces attack Jamaica, Blood and other convict-slaves manage to escape. Blood goes on to capture a Spanish ship and become one of the best pirate-buccaneers of the Caribbean. He also encounters Arabella on a merchant ship and duels with a French pirate to win her.  His gentlemanly instincts prevent Blood from having his way with his “prize,” however . . .

Richard would, of course, make an incredibly dashing, charismatic pirate and would be able to out-act Errol, who was appearing in his first high-profile role. This would also be a great excuse for RA to either grow out his hair or get extensions. Because he rocks the long locks . . . and the pirate shirts . .  and those thigh-high boots.

Captain Blood (Errol Flynn) lounging with a couple of friends.

Captain Blood (Errol Flynn) lounging with fellow pirate Basil Rathbone and a friend.

FYI: The character of Peter Blood is actually based on three real-life individuals, Henry Morgan, Thomas Blood, and Henry Pitman, a doctor who was actually caught up in the rebellion, arrested and sold into slavery in Barbados, where he was captured by pirates (although unlike his fictional counterpart, he didn’t join them in their exploits).

These are just a couple of classic film roles in the historical adventure/romance genre I wouldn’t mind seeing Richard perform. A girl can dream, can’t she? 😉

He’s downright balsamaceous, that boy: TAE Word for the Day

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(And I’d like to hear him say that word, too.)

Balsamaceous: (adjective): Possessing healing or restorative properties.

The word derives from the Latin balsamum, “resin of the balm tree.” The substance is historically celebrated for its aroma and healing properties.

Dr. Track is a healer by profession, and with his steadfast dedication and delightful bedside manner, he certainly makes us feel better.

And whilst John Porter is a tough soldier by trade with kickass skills, his gentleness and compassion helped Katie through the trauma of her captivity even as he worked to free her. This balsamaceous hero is tops in our books.

Our Victorian hero, Mr. Thornton, restores our belief in foolish passion and sweet romance. Surely he’s been a balm to many a troubled spirit.

Dear Harry Kennedy. His sweet, sunny, nurturing nature–perhaps a reflection of his CReAtor’s own lovely character?–cannot fail to bring a smile to our faces and a warm tug on our hearts.

Just a few examples of Mr. A’s balsamaceous characters. But of course, the most balsamaceous of them all is the man himself.

Lovely, funny, brilliant, modest, insightful, endearing, charismatic . . . how you touch our hearts, minds and souls, Richard Armitage.

Twofer Tuesday: Iconic Armitage

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John Thornton was the leading role that really put Richard on the radar for many fans. Now few can imagine anyone else filling the Victorian mill owner’s shoes better than Richard Armitage did. Whilst The Hobbit hasn’t yet debuted on the big screen, I have no doubt Thorin will become his second iconic role, winning him scads of new fans worldwide. Here’s to two amazing chaRActers carefully crafted and filled with passion and purpose by our RA: Thornton and Thorin!!

The course of true love . . .

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The course of true love never did run smooth.~William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Oddly enough, ever so often the Centurylink DSL gods smile down on me and allow me to load a video in less than two hours. Combine this with a certain degree of annoying pain interfering with rest and here you have it: the remake of “To Make You Feel My Love.” This one’s for Judit.

There’s no place like it.

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Home, that is.

Dorothy’s magical red slippers in The Wizard of Oz. (courtesy of drafthouse.com)

I didn’t have to tap my ruby red slippers together three times to get here–just climb ever so carefully in and out of a Chevy Traverse a few times and then a dusty Jeep  for the final leg of the journey. Finally, with the assistance of a quad cane and my dear hubby, I navigated across the yard, past the enthusiastic greetings of Rascal and Elvis and up the steps to the deck. A few more steps, and I was home.

When you aren’t feeling well, there really is no place quite like home. As much as I loved those glorious views I shared with you all, and the time I spent with my darling sister, I stretched out last night with a most satisfied sigh on my own bed, cradled by the memory foam topper.

Benny kindly unloaded the vehicle, brought me some aspirin and reminded me to stick a pillow under my ankle. He’d already fitted a foam tube to the fat purple toe and taped it to the one next door while we were still in Orange Beach. Really, with a broken “little piggy” there isn’t much else you can do, except to give it time and try not to aggravate the injury.

I was so exhausted I fell asleep early, woke up enough to bid him a good day at work and then drifted back to sleep again, cozy and comfy under the quilt and throw, the little heater keeping the bedroom nice and snug.

It’s been almost a year since he had to tend to me and a busted body part. Thank goodness it was only the toe this time around and not my tailbone. And thank goodness it happened at the end of my visit and the beginning. There is always something to be thankful for, isn’t there?

As always, I am thankful for all of you, and for the delightful human being who brought us together in the first place.

Because there’s nobody quite like him, is there?

He’s just what we’d been waiting for . . .

Paradise in a sunrise, paradise in those eyes . . .

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I woke up early this morning and slipped outside to the balcony to watch the sun rise. It was still chilly and dampish and my knit zip-front jacket felt good.

 

As I sipped my coffee (made super strong to suit my BIL; I trick it out with liberal amounts of half and half and sugar),  I could hear the deep, rather mournful sound of the foghorn in the distance. The exterior lights lining the board walks to the beach still glowed.

I think it’s going to be another beautiful day in this little taste of paradise.

And speaking of paradise . . .

RA’s Heartbreakers: Rogues, Cons & Bad Boys

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Philip Durant, the husband with the roving eye and a potential murder suspect in Agatha Christie’s Ordeal by Innocence.

Lee Preston, the firty-girty lifeguard with the irresistible charm and an inability to be faithful to one woman in “Cold Feet.”

The charming Stage Door Johnny, Percy Courtenay, who swept future Edwardian musical hall star Marie Lloyd of her feet in “Marie Lloyd.”

John Mulligan, the boy from the wrong side of the tracks turned successful businessman–and, perhaps, more in :”Moving On.”

Heinz Kruger, crafty murderous spy for the evil Hydra in “Captain America.”

Percy and his angel face after shaving.

More Studies in Sepia and Autumnal Reflections

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That face

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The dark brows drawn slightly together, a furrow between them. Pensive, apprehensive. The eyes, framed in a fringe of dark lashes, half in shadow, so intense. The sculpted plane of those high cheekbones. A delicately shaped mouth, both soft and firmly resolute.  The chin, strong and masculine.  A man of beauty.  A man of reflection. A man of character.

I did get some well-needed sleep during the day after being awake all night. I was feeling marginally better earlier but seem to be going downhill again. I still sound like a man. 😉 I hope the rest of you out there dealing with sinus/allergy/colds/bronchitis and what have you, are improving. Take care, everyone. Time to try to eat supper.