Tag Archives: Sir Guy of Gisbourne

Fedoralady on ‘Manhunter,’ ‘Hannibal’ and Armitage’s flawed heroes (who haven’t actually eaten anyone)

Standard

Richard and I have “been together” for just under eight years now. I discovered him as that absolutely delicious baddie (who turned into a goodie but still had to die for his past sins) Sir Guy on BBC America.

Initially I found Sir Guy to be a smarmy bastard, albeit a good-looking one. I did not fall for him right away as many viewers did when watching RA as John Thornton three years earlier in “North and South.” It was more of a slow burn . . .

aaaabehinblueeyesbblcsnap-00779

I noticed something curious happening—the villainous master-of-arms actually had a heart, damaged and flawed though it might be, with glimmers of humanity in all its vulnerability peeking through that arrogant, brutish facade.

By the end of the first series, I was solidly Team Leather, and angry with Marian for leaving him at the altar. I grew increasingly tired of her machinations in the second series. Marian was a tease, and it was a dangerous game she played with this passionate man who went out of his way more than once to protect her from Vasey.

When she taunted him so cruelly in the desert, I decided she had lost her mind. Poor, devastated Sir Guy acted in desperation and disbelief to her words, and went on to clearly mourn her far more than her husband of five minutes ever seemed to do.

By the end of the third and final series, I cried like a baby. I mourned the death of Sir Guy more than I did  some of the actual flesh-and-blood relatives in my extended family. I was, and am, and shall ever remain a Sir Guy of Gisborne apologist.

BeFunky_epnine_031

Richard Armitage doesn’t have to play “good” characters for me to relate to them, care about them, root for and mourn for them. I love his flawed heroes like John Porter, Lucas North (I don’t believe in Bateman) and Thorin. These characters are all complicated and damaged creatures with their own particular emotional baggage: professional disgrace and estrangement from family, prison, loss of home and fortune, each of them struggling in his own way to reclaim his former life and redeem himself (John Proctor I will discuss in a future post. He deserves one all his own).

Richard has himself said in the past his fans won’t like all the roles he chooses, and at the time I thought primarily of Thorin. Let’s face it, more than a few people, fans and non-fans alike, raised eyebrows over the idea of our tall, handsome heartthrob of a fellow as a 250-odd-year-old hirsute dwarf who could have played Disney’s “Grumpy” as far as his personality was sketched out in Tolkien’s original novel. This character certainly wasn’t the romantic period hero or the charming rom-com leading man some fans were hoping to see him play.

Today, Thorin is the favorite RA character of many newer fans, their gateway to discover other Armitage projects, and they can’t imagine anyone else performing in that role (neither can I). It turns out vertically-challenged hairy dudes can become major heartthrobs, too–at least when played by Richard Armitage.

BA7pNKlCcAAavsmddd

Richard managed to not only look majestic and handsome beneath the dwarf suit, wig and prosthetics, he also fleshed out that role and brought those subtle layers to Thorin. We felt our hearts constrict when the paranoia and gold lust overcame the warrior king, we cried when he saw him fall “one last time.” Another death, another redeemed character.

But how do I deal with Francis Dolarhyde, a cannibalistic serial killer? Here is a character who does not kill people as part of his employment as a medieval henchman in a difficult time when life was “nasty, short and brutish.” Nor is this character a member of the military or the secret service who sometimes must take a life to save many others.

He’s not a warrior prince fighting to take back the kingdom lost to a fierce dragon years before in order to reclaim a throne and restore his people to their rightful place.

Dolarhyde is a monster who kills innocent people and eats portions of them . . . and let me be perfectly honest. It makes me more than a little uneasy to think I might possibly fall for a monster, even one that’s a fictional character. I guess I wonder if I do get infatuated with Dolarhyde, just what might that say about me? Yes, I know the character had an awful childhood. So do a lot of other people who don’t turn out like this.

1689497_10204147508594482_5545988146003288582_n

I have read the book “Red Dragon” and while I didn’t see the film of the same name, I have viewed the 1986 Michael Mann film “Manhunter” starring William Petersen of CSI fame as the Will Graham character. It’s actually a very well-made film with solid performances, including that of Tom Noonan in the Dolarhyde role. I felt a certain pity for Dolarhyde in this film, but he also scared the daylights out of me.

thHB7J4B83It’s been a number of years since I last saw it, and I would like to see it again.  ( Images found on Bing. Noonan as Dolarhyde and Petersen as Graham).

Dolarhyde-manhunter-16791786-1280-544

manhunter

Manhunter frammenti di un omicidio

I am currently watching the new season of “Hannibal” and find I have no desire to re-watch the two eps I have seen so far. I have read raves about this series from critics and some of its fans, but somehow, I am not “getting it,” not yet. I suppose it would help if I had seen the first two seasons, but I have no desire to do that, either.

Does it have great production values? Yes. Does it have a talented cast? Yes. Do I thus far find it excessively bloody, at times pretentious and on the boring side? Yes, yes and yes. Apparently the ratings are down, making me suspect many of RA’s legion of fans are opting out of watching it until RA appears in the last six eps, and some, not even then. Cannibalistic serial killer seems to be that deal-breaker role for some of us.

I certainly haven’t shied away from scary, spooky, even gory films and TV series in the past. I am not averse to dark, morbid humor. I loved “Dexter,” and its protagonist was a Miami crime scene blood specialist who, oh yeah, was also a serial killer, BUT he only killed other serial killers and similarly rotten individuals. He had a code taught to him by his adoptive father, a cop who recognized the tendencies within his son and taught him how to channel his “dark passenger.” Michael C. Hall did a marvelous job of making Dexter somehow likeable and relatable even as we glimpsed the monster within.

th

(Michael C. Hall as Dexter Morgan. Bing IMages)

So I am truly curious to see what Mr. Armitage will bring to the table (other than body parts) in this role. We know from the stills already released that he is in fine physical form for the role and if nothing else, we can enjoy that, I suppose. But I have always found more to appreciate in his performances than merely those bodacious biceps and broad shoulders. Those attributes are the yummy icing on the cake of the chaRActers for me.

Thus far, “Hannibal” just isn’t doing it for me. I want to tell Will Graham (Hugh Dancy) to get away from that crazy nutcase, the same for Gillian Anderson (who plays Hannibal’s wife).

Mads Mikkelsen is a very prominent and respected actor in his native Denmark, and considered quite sexy by many, but honestly, he was creeping me out before I saw him in this role. Granted, I’ve only seen him as a Bond baddie, a BBC Sherlock Holmes baddie and as Igor Stravinski in a film about his affair with Coco Chanel that I found beautiful to look at but ultimately empty—style over substance. The sex scenes seemed clinical and cold. He doesn’t capture my imagination the same way RA does. Maybe if he did, I wouldn’t find “Hannibal” such a disappointment  . . .

th7OK4DE0H

This role is not helping the gut “ick” reaction I have to Mr. Mikkelsen to subside. Then again, he is also playing a cannibalistic serial killer, so should I not be icked out? I just have very, very, very mixed feelings about all of this.  I don’t like what I call “torture porn” such as one sees in films like the “Saw” franchise and this show is feeling like that for me, albeit with an elegant and refined façade tacked over it.

Oh, Richard. I understand and applaud your desire to take on a variety of roles rather than falling into the rut of playing the same character again and again. To challenge yourself, to stretch yourself as an actor. To take us on new journeys of discovery with your characters.

And I am sure you will do a brilliant job of bringing Francis Dolarhyde to the small screen, just as you have in so many other roles.  I have complete faith in your acting abilities and good sense.

I just wish that you had stretched in a different direction this time around.

Then again, what do I know? This controversial character may become a new fan favorite–and bring you a whole new crop of fans. We shall see . . .

Sir Guy is ever so smug. Hold on there, big fella. Ricky’s here, too!

Standard

“He really IS getting in touch with his inner hot henchman, isn’t he?” Sir Guy said with a trademark smirk.

7_168

“I mean–look at the longer hair. The leather. I started it all, you know.”

aaaabblcsnap-00779

1475882_224957937684593_695125930_n

Photo by Sarah Dunn Photography

“Listen, Mate, you aren’t the only bloke the CReAtor has been channeling just lately. There’s some of ME, too,” another deep, husky voice sounded. “In leather–AND in plaid.”

vlcsnap-00148

1476229_234812010013432_1287208735_n

971640_224958344351219_397499621_n

By Sarah Dunn Photography

vlcsnap-00182rickye
Sir Guy sniffed and folded his arms across his chest. He nodded slowly, begrudgingly. “I suppose so—” He smirked again. “But I was still FIRST. And have you seen that other black leather jacket of his–pure ME . . .”

1426184_553168768090541_1461877989_n
Ricky’s mouth curled with amused disdain. “Don’t like yourself much, do you?”

Guy’s eyebrows rose. “What’s not to love?”

Indeed.

The publicity machine, shyness & ‘safe’ skiing: check out Richard’s ‘Profile’

Standard

An intriguing profile by Adam Jacque of Richard from Sunday’s The Independent UK. Many thanks to RANet for the heads-up. The more I know of him, the more I know I will never “know” him and the more he fascinates me.

Would love to hear your thoughts on this . . . and I do think it’s pretty safe to assume Richard would like to be asked some different questions. And in spite of his shyness, I’d say he’s a very interesting guy.

I never like to go out of character when filming starts I fear that if I do, I might not be able to pick it up again. This was particularly the case with the character Thorin Oakenshield [in Peter Jackson’s The Hobbit]. He’s moody and broody, so people kept their distance from me during the production. I wish I was good at jumping out of character in between takes, as I’d be more popular socially.

Publicity for ‘The Hobbit’ was relentless I was travelling and doing junkets around the world, being asked the same questions every day for three weeks. Then at the end of the working day I’d have to get down the red carpet. It’s pretty hard work. I much prefer being in front of a camera.

I love how Gary Oldman disappears into a role You see a character before you see him; you believe him as he’s so invested in that character, such as his George Smiley in Tinker Tailor… That’s what I’m striving for.

I’d like to act in a film without special effects I’ve spent the past two years in a special FX environment for The Hobbit. I also need to find something where I’m not fighting or inflicting violence on someone, as a lot of the roles I’ve had, such as Lucas North in Spooks and Guy of Gisborne in Robin Hood, have involved that. I don’t know why that’s been the case!

It’s bloody annoying being shy I’ll spend a whole evening at a party asking everyone else about themselves. I’m not being self-deprecating; it’s because I’m too shy to talk about myself. So people come away from the evening actually having learnt nothing about me.

I hate selfishness in people I lean towards the Japanese idea of “you first”, such as always allowing another to walk through a door before you. Though admittedly, in their culture, this [thoughtfulness] is shame-based, to some extent.

I’m an avid skier Most of the time that I’ve been skiing, I’ve been about to go and film something, so I’m always living in fear of a broken leg and I ski very safely. I’ve taken a few tumbles, though. I once flipped and bounced on my head, landing in a mess on the floor; it’s a dangerous sport but it’s exhilarating and it allows me to unwind.

Snowboarders ruin the piste They shave off all the snow so it’s like an ice patch, and they sit in the middle of the piste, chatting with friends in a line, so you have to jump over them as you come over the crest of a hill.

I’d like to live off-grid I’m fascinated with the documentation of the environment [and its degradation] through photography, and our hunt to move away from fossil fuels and towards new technology. I’m attempting to build a home that uses water, wind or solar power. Right now it’s just a pastime, but it’s an exciting prospect.

Richard Armitage, 41, is a British actor. ‘The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey‘ is available on DVD from tomorrow

Black tie or black leather, he’s bee-you-tiful.

Standard

OK, still struggling with this head-jaw-neck-shoulder situation, which happens to be on my left side, and I am left-handed. Anyway, now using one of those rice-filled wraps you can heat in the microwave and another muscle relaxer. Working on a post featuring Monet‘s house and garden (absolutely beautiful!!) in Giverny, but it is slow going. Supper–cube steak and gravy–is simmering away in the slow cooker and tea is steeping. In the meantime, my lovelies, enjoy the man in black tie, black leather and open-collared shirt (back, kathryngaul, back!!).

Sunday Behind the Scenes with Richard: Sir Guy of Robin Hood

Standard

Richard in a S2 DVD extra interview. The leather pants straining over the thighs. The bare arms. The great eye makeup job. Our medieval rock god.

 

 

Richard and His Ridiculously Attractive Hands. I love how he talks with them, don't you?

 

 

A shot with the tracking dolly from the seige on Nottingham Castle from S3 extras.

 

 

Love to see Richard laughing--especially in his Guy guise.

 

 

Told ya I loved those hands. And everything here.

 

 

An intellligent, thoughtful, interesting and talented actor. And a glorious-looking one.

 

 

 

 

 

Rare and Amusing Insults: Guy & the Cockaloram

Standard

Vasey was always hurling insults at our poor Gizzy, the sheriff’s favorite whipping boy.

"Stop sniveling, Gisborne! If you didn't go around painting your arm like a girl . . ."

Here’s a good insult Guy could have used to describe  his loathsome employer.

Cockalorum: A boastful and self-important person; a strutting little fellow.

 

 

What Guy is thinking: God's tears! It's bad enough to see this cockalorum fully dressed--but in the rude nude. That's a cockalorum I just don't want to see . . . or hear. *sigh*

 

 

This Robin fellow could be pretty much of a cockalorum, too, come to think of it.

 

Screencaps courtesy of RANet

It’s Guy Friday once again! Here’s some Reasonably Happy Gorgeous Henchman for you.

Standard

Some pretty pictures of Sir Guy in a good mood. He’s happy it’s Friday, too, it seems.

Oh, you are such a foxy fellow, aren't you, my beloved henchman?

I lurv this one. The smile, the eyes. The awesome masculinity.

Oh, Guy. She's gonna run out on you, but at least you can have some temporary satisfaction.

Richard Armitage loves the baddies. And he keeps me from hating them.

Standard

Richard Armitage has said he is not interested in playing floppy-haired heroic types (but, darn it, Rich, we love your floppy tresses!) and when he does play heroes, he looks for their dark side. After all, perfection would be a bit–boring, would it not?

He loves playing the bad guys, and he’s so very good at it.  Because just as he looks for the dark side in the heroes, he also seeks the humanity, the light, no matter how dim, within his darker characters.  And he always finds it. It makes all the difference in how I respond to characters like Paul Andrews, John Mulligan, Robert Lovelace , Heinz Kruger or my beloved Sir Guy of Gisborne.

John Mulligan--"Could you be a devil? Could you be an angel?"
In RA's hands, you are one complex, charismatic baddie.

I find myself unable to completely despise any of the cads, rogues, heinous henchmen or sinister spies he has played thus far. I may reject many of their actions and attitudes and find elements of their characters revolting; still, that glimpse of humanity, that sometimes subtle-yet-discernible struggle between good and evil, allows me to identify with them and empathize in a way I rarely do with other actors when playing the same types of roles.

Heinz, you are a saboteur and a murderer. And yet--I feel the need to know more about why you chose this path rather than immediately condemning you. Would I feel the same if another actor had played the role? Would I even care?

I have asked myself, “Is it because, as Lucy Griffiths quipped on one of the RH commentaries,  Richard makes  ‘such a good-looking murderer?'”

Is it Richard’s beauty and charisma blinding me to the characters’ flaws that keeps me from despising the baddies?  I honestly don’t think so.  I clearly see these are flawed, damaged, sometimes amoral and dangerous men who also happen to possess great looks and considerable charm.  The latter qualities certainly can make them easier on the eye and soften one up a bit.

Sir Guy: vain, temperamental, hungry for wealth and power, the evil Vasey's henchman who has killed and tortured for the sheriff. And yet. We also see his vulnerability, his naivety, his aching need for love, his ability to show courage and chivalry.

Still, it’s what is going on inside these characters that ultimately makes them so compelling for me.  It’s that glimmer of light inside the darkness. It’s wondering where they came from, what molded them into the men they have become and what lies ahead of them. In Sir Guy’s case, it was longing for that redemptive arc, for him to become the good man, the hero we knew he was capable of being. Before Richard, could we imagine a Sir Guy of Gisborne we’d actually prefer over the titular hero of the show?

A baddie in Richard’s hands becomes a three-dimensional, fully-fleshed-out character, a real human being with a mind, a heart and soul. And knowing they are created with such detail and dedication by  this wonderful actor, who works so hard to breath life into each one, makes me appreciate them all, good, bad, and something somewhere in-between.

So, Richard. Maybe what we need is a complex anti-hero role where you start out a baddie, end up a goodie, get the girl and survive past the final credits?  Angst, danger, brooding, romance, heroism and ultimately a happy ending. What do ya think?

"Hmmmm. Better shop that sort of scenario around to some scriptwriters . . ."

I love Guy when he’s bein’ all bad-ass and wolfish, don’t you?

Standard

The darkening eye, the flash of white teeth and those strong, nimble fingers. The wolf is after its prey. I think I would come out and play with this Big Bad Wolf if he asked . . .

Oh, those big, beautiful--and sometimes lethal-- hands. And the glimpse of those piercing eyes.

Ah, the floppy hair and the dangerous glint in those kohl-rimmed eyes.

The wolf shows off his sharp claw.

Thwarted yet again. And still sexy as ever.

Early start on Guyday Friday: Sheriff at last, if not for long

Standard

We saw Guy finally achieve his dream of being named the Sheriff of Nottingham after killing the sheriff and doing away with Isabella and Robin. Or so he thought. Guy, oh Guy–you have to stick around and make sure the dead are really DEAD. Still, for a few brief, shining moments, you were the Big Man on Campus in Nottingham. And power looked good on you.  (screencaps courtesy of RANet)

He's done the prince's bidding, slaved away for years under the poisonous troll Vasey, doing his dirty work, collecting his blood money. Guy doesn't want to wait any longer.

The sheriff is dead, along with Isabella and Hood. Now Guy's time has come.

There's an almost child-like glee--the kid at Christmas opening his longed-for present--as Guy looks at the castle's keys finally in his own beautiful hands.

He can barely believe it has finally happened.

PJ introduces Guy as the new sheriff. At long last . . .

That rare thing. A true grin on Guy's face. It won't last long, but it's lovely to see it whilst it does.

A storm’s a-brewin': the volatile Sir Guy

Standard

Sure, he sneers, snarls, sniffs and walks around with a face like thunder. But a good storm can be fascinating–if frightening–to watch. Especially when the thunder and lightning come in that tall, smouldering leather-clad package known as Sir Guy of Gisborne. I am sure you’ll agree . . .
(Guy screencaps courtesy of RANet)

(smashingtips.com)

(mississippi red cross)


Super Sexy Saturday starts with RA’s eye-catching “bad boys” in another new vid

Standard

So what do you do when you feel very creative but your hands don’t feel like doing a lot of typing and your eyes are a bit fuzzy for writing?

You make another video where you can look at a lot of pretty pictures of Mr. A’s characters. Obviously.

I hope everyone is having a lovely weekend. Check out all the goodies at FanstRAvaganza 3 which ends Sunday.

PS Ever heard of a book called Fifty Shades of Grey by EL James, part of a trilogy?  I just downloaded to my Kindle. It’s supposed to be quite a sexy page-turner. I will let you all know what I think. ;)

Another new video: The Way That I Want to Touch You . . .

Standard

I’ve been raiding my mental closet again, and found yet another song from my younger days. This song’s lyrics made me think of Richard and the wonderful array of characters he has given us. Characters who bring darkness and light, sunshine and shadow–who are very touchable, or so I imagine.  And I love Toni’s voice.

Never fear, Guyday Friday will continue. I have my final F3 post going up tonight. Let’s just say it has ties to Guy. ;) And you might get some pretty pictures in-between.

Flashback: Wild Man Guy and the Mysterious Appeal of the Greasy Mane

Standard

Those mad eyes peering through the dark tangle of hair, the open mouth--oh dear. Such a visceral reaction.

Yeah, he's unkempt. He's dirty. But I would still try to wrestle him down and drag him off to my womancave for fun and games. Then clean him up afterwards. Bathtime can be fun, no?

(I wrote this a while back and posted at LJ. And Wild Man Guy still has this effect on me. I should add my husband is astonishingly good-humored about my whole RA addiction. But sometimes I do make him scratch his head a bit.)

The Mysterious Appeal of a Greasy Mane; or My Spouse Thinks I’m Crazy

Men just don’t get it sometimes. That knowledge was reinforced this weekend when my husband watched the first episode of Robin Hood S3 when they re-ran it on BBC America.

“Is that him?” Benny queried, as a boozy, hollow-eyed Sir Guy of Gisborne, his greasy, tangled mane falling across his face, told Jasper and the sheriff he had killed Robin “with these hands.”

“Richard? Yes, that’s him in the center – Guy,” carefully avoiding any “squee”- type response. I try to be sensitive to the male ego. And I do love the dear old thing (50 next month).

“The gay-looking guy?” He said incredulously.

I huffed just a little. “He is s-o-o-o not gay.”

He rolled his eyes and moved over to the computer desk, as I continued to watch my gorgeous and so-not-gay dark knight.

His eyes would occasionally stray upwards to where the TV sat.

“You see, Richard can really act with that hair, honey. Guy’s all angsty and in torment right now because of what happened with Marian . . .”

Benny’s expression remained noncommittal.

“And I find it – very – appealing.”

He gave me that “you must be crazy” look I’ve seen a few too many times.

“Look, I can appreciate a good-looking guy, but that-” he jerked his head toward Shaggy Guy’s image – “that greasy mop and all is just not attractive.”

I sighed. ~Oh, it is to me, honey. The things I want to do to him. And then the fun I’d have cleaning him up afterwards~

Discretion being the better part of valor, I kept those thoughts to myself.

“He has a real animal magnetism. It’s like I have this – primal response,” I said with a rather sheepish shrug.

“Hmmmm.” Raising a skeptical brow, he shook his head.

Sir Guy of Gisborne (BBC TV drama)

Image via Wikipedia


Of course, we all know Sir Guy cleans up nicely. But I like him dirty, too.

Undaunted, I showed him my lovely netbook wallpaper featuring shots of Richard circa “Cold Feet.”
“Now you have to agree he looks perfectly presentable there,” I insisted.“Yeah, he looks OK there.”

~OK? I want to lick my computer screen!~

“Anyway, it’s a good thing he’s off in England, it’ll limit your opportunities to stalk him,” he added dryly.

~As if! I mean, really~

It was no use. He just couldn’t comprehend the fact that a boozy, greasy, wild-eyed medieval knight played by one Mr. Armitage was a breed apart.

I did have one triumphant moment. He knows I am no great admirer of Robin.

“I’ll agree with you on one thing,” he said. “That Robin Hood is sure nothing to write home about . . .”

Finally. A meeting of the minds.

Men just don’t get it sometimes, do they?