Tag Archives: Heinz Kruger

Sunday SmorgRgAsbord: Secret Agent Men

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Wanted to bring you more photo edits of our spies for MI6, MI5 and Hydra, but WP is not being kind to me today. And I REALLY need a nap (asleep after 2, awake by 4:30 a.m.) so enjoy what’s here, including the Johnny Rivers’ classic, “Secret Agent Man.” ūüėȬ† All the shows are done now, we are pleased with results of DVD sales and also response of those watching¬†themselves larger than life¬†last night on the wall of the theatre, the sound pretty awesome coming through the theatre’s system.¬† ūüėÄ

It’ll take me a couple of days to get up to speed, so bear with me. I have some chores to do related to Pecan Ridge Productions, amongst other things. Hope all are well.

41: RA’s climacteric year?

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Climacteric: (noun) 1. a critical period. 2. A year in which important changes in health, fortune, etc. are held by some theories to occur, such as one’s¬†65th year.¬†3. The period of maximum respiration¬†in a fruit, in which it¬†becomes fully ripened.¬† (Also refers to a physiological period involving a decrease in reproductive capacity in men and women, culminating, in women, in menopause).

In 2004, the year he turned 33, Richard Armitage (unexpectedly, it would seem, from the BBC’s standpoint) became something of an “overnight sensation” in the UK after captivating a large contingent of females with his performance as the sober Victorian mill owner capable of a “foolish passion” in North & South.¬† Of course, the man had been toiling for years as a struggling actor, doing DIY work for friends¬†and taking front of house jobs to make ends meet while trying to find that the success that seemed to elude him–therefore “overnight sensation” in quotes.

 

Thornton became an iconic role for Richard Armitage, with many audience members choosing him as their ideal romantic hero.  More television roles came. His first starring role after N&S,  caring air emergency doctor Alex Track in the series The Golden Hour, was short-lived, but he ended up stealing the show as the beautiful, conflicted henchman Guy of Gisborne in Robin Hood and making us fall in love with an enigmatic spy named Lucas North in Spooks.  There were other television roles, too, including the charismatic businessman with a dark side, John Mulligan in Moving On.

Then came the tough, yet tender and sexy-as-hell sergeant John Porter in Strike Back, not to mention the various audiobooks, advertisements, TV narrations and other jobs our workaholic fit into his schedule–and his first significant role in a blockbuster, the sinister Hydra spy¬†Heinz Kruger in Captain America.

 

 

His fandom continued to grow and his talent seemed to go from strength to strength. Even when fans hated what was done to some of his character *holds up hand* they rarely faulted him on the quality of his performances and the versatility he continued to show in his roles.

Richard Armitage turned 41 this past August. And he seems to be in the midst of another truly climacteric year–one of gigantic proportions, I suspect.¬† Because he’s about to appear in one of, if not the biggest of the big films this holiday season, helmed¬†by¬†no less than Sir¬†Peter Jackson,¬†beloved director of¬†the spectacularly successful film trilogy LOTR. It’s a¬†film that has its own built-in, wildly enthusiastic audience (as witnessed by Comic-Con). And Richard is undeniably one of its stars, right up there with Martin Freeman and Sir Ian McKellen.

 

 

 

The publicity machine for The Hobbit is well underway–and before the film arrives in theaters,¬†we’ve got lots of Richard to look forward to, in tie-in books, in magazine and television interviews and more, a veritable RA/Thorin bonanza. And I am not complaining.

John Thornton was Richard’s first iconic role; surely Thorin Oakenshield, the brave, fierce, charismatic dwarf warrior will be his next, and one viewed by a much, much larger audience across the world.¬† In this climacteric year, Richard Armitage is going to become very well-known, and I suspect many audience members will want to know what’s underneath all that yak hair and makeup.¬† And what else this impressive actor has appeared in. Ah, the pleasures that await them!

And I, for one, am delighted at the thought of it, of the thought of fans of all ages, both sexes, all nationalities, etc. discovering more about our wonderful RA.¬† I see his fan base growing and diversifying with his starring role in The Hobbit. If any actor deserves that sort of attention, it’s Richard Armitage. His talent, his intelligence, his dedication to his roles, his professionalism, the intensity he brings to every project–and the fact he is such a worthwhile human being on top of it all–makes my heart sing with gladness for this man.

I would say year 41 is truly¬†turning out to be¬†climacteric for our beautiful guy. Who will also be gracing screens as schoolteacher Gary Morris in Black Sky¬†in 2013.¬†What’s up next for RA? I don’t know, but I do know I¬†will be along for the ride, come what may.

Vive Richard Armitage!!

Who’s your baddie?: Poll

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We all know Richard Armitage enjoys playing baddies. Of course, I don’t even consider my first and favorite RA ChaRActer, Sir Guy of Gisborne, to be truly bad–just misunderstood.

Excluding the Sultan of Smoulder, who is your favorite amoral/immoral bad boy  ChaRActer? Tell us why.  Is it someone not listed here? If so, who?

RA’s Heartbreakers: Rogues, Cons & Bad Boys

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Philip Durant, the husband with the roving eye and a¬†potential murder suspect in Agatha Christie’s Ordeal by Innocence.

Lee Preston, the firty-girty lifeguard with the irresistible charm and an inability to be faithful to one woman in “Cold Feet.”

The charming Stage Door Johnny, Percy Courtenay, who swept future Edwardian musical hall star Marie Lloyd of her feet in “Marie Lloyd.”

John Mulligan, the boy from the wrong side of the tracks turned successful businessman–and, perhaps, more in :”Moving On.”

Heinz Kruger, crafty murderous spy for the evil Hydra in “Captain America.”

Percy and his angel face after shaving.

More Miscellaneous Monday with the lads & thank you!

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Good day to all! It’s another rainy, thunder-y¬†afternoon here in LA (Lower Alabama).¬† It’s staying relatively cool, which is a blessing. I can survive without running the A/C and that’s less highway robbery I have to pay the electric cooperative.¬† ūüėČ

A big thank you to all those who have already contributed to my Comic-Con Trip Fund. Your generosity is noted and truly appreciated!¬†For anyone who cares to¬†contribute, just use the donate button at the top of the sidebar. And thanks again to RA Frenzy for setting it up for me. The best fans and bloggers in the world are part of “our little community.”¬†Anyone who would prefer to send funds directly ( and I have had a few who do) just let me know and I can send you the info. Merci beaucoup! And John Standring thinks it’s swell, too.

This handsome gent below also extends his thanks.

And continuing our miscellaneous theme, more random images of Mr. A and his ChaRActers . . .

Need a Tuesday Mood Boost? I’ve got just the thing . . .

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Feelin' grumpy??

If your Tuesday is not going so terrifically, don’t despair. Just take a generous dose of the man below at regular intervals.

 

Richard Armitage: good for what ails you.

 

 

Why not rock out while Richarding?? Turn it up, baby!!

Bliss out with the help of the sexiest man in the universe . . . people will wonder what you've been up to.

 

Poll: Who is your favorite RA “bad boy?” (Choose up to three)

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I will never ask you what your least liked Richard Armitage characters are, because honestly, there is something I appreciate about each and every one of them and it sort of hurts my feelings to think of any of them being rejected, yes, even Heinous Heinz.  (This is no slam at Ali and the recent poll at Richard Armitage Net; hey, after a while and especially with an RA drought, you run out of ideas!)

But I am curious as to which of Richard’s¬† dodgy/rebellious/amoral/ criminal¬†characters is your favorite, and why?¬†I will even let you choose three.

Richard Armitage loves the baddies. And he keeps me from hating them.

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Richard¬†Armitage has said he is¬†not interested in playing floppy-haired heroic types (but, darn it, Rich, we love your floppy tresses!) and when he does play heroes, he looks for their dark side. After all, perfection would be a bit–boring, would it not?

He loves playing the bad guys, and he’s so very good at it.¬† Because just as he looks for the dark side in the heroes, he also seeks the humanity, the light, no matter how dim,¬†within his darker characters.¬† And he always finds it. It makes all the difference in how I respond to characters¬†like Paul Andrews, John Mulligan,¬†Robert Lovelace¬†, Heinz Kruger or my beloved Sir Guy of Gisborne.

John Mulligan--"Could you be a devil? Could you be an angel?"
In RA's hands, you are one complex, charismatic baddie.

I find myself unable to completely despise any of the cads, rogues, heinous henchmen or sinister spies he has played thus far. I may reject many of their actions and attitudes and find elements of their characters revolting; still, that glimpse of humanity, that sometimes subtle-yet-discernible struggle between good and evil, allows me to identify with them and empathize in a way I rarely do with other actors when playing the same types of roles.

Heinz, you are a saboteur and a murderer. And yet--I feel the need to know more about why you chose this path rather than immediately condemning you. Would I feel the same if another actor had played the role? Would I even care?

I have asked myself, “Is it because, as Lucy Griffiths quipped on one of the RH commentaries,¬† Richard makes¬† ‘such a good-looking murderer?'”

Is it Richard’s beauty and charisma blinding me to the characters’ flaws that keeps me from despising the baddies?¬† I honestly don’t think so.¬† I clearly see these are flawed, damaged, sometimes amoral and¬†dangerous men who also happen to possess great looks and considerable charm.¬† The latter qualities certainly can make them easier on the eye and soften one up a bit.

Sir Guy: vain, temperamental, hungry for wealth and power, the evil Vasey's henchman who has killed and tortured for the sheriff. And yet. We also see his vulnerability, his naivety, his aching need for love, his ability to show courage and chivalry.

Still, it’s what is going on inside these characters that ultimately makes them so compelling for me.¬† It’s that glimmer of light inside the darkness. It’s wondering where they came from, what molded them into the men they have become and what lies ahead of them. In Sir Guy’s case, it was longing for that redemptive arc, for him to become the good man, the hero we knew he was capable of being. Before Richard, could we imagine a Sir Guy of Gisborne we’d actually prefer over the titular hero of the show?

A baddie¬†in Richard’s hands becomes a three-dimensional, fully-fleshed-out¬†character, a real human being with a mind, a¬†heart and soul. And knowing they are created with such detail and dedication by¬† this wonderful actor, who works so hard to breath life into each one, makes me appreciate them all, good, bad, and something somewhere in-between.

So, Richard. Maybe what we need is a complex anti-hero role where you start out a baddie, end up a goodie, get the girl and survive past the final credits?  Angst, danger, brooding, romance, heroism and ultimately a happy ending. What do ya think?

"Hmmmm. Better shop that sort of scenario around to some scriptwriters . . ."